Amazing Crochet Health Stories from the Google Archives

by Kathryn on August 7, 2012 · 3 comments

in Crochet Health

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One of the things that I love about Google news is that you can use the archives to look for newspaper articles from decades ago. I really enjoy looking for historic crochet news and announcements using this tool because it gives me more information and insight into how our craft was viewed in the 50′s or 60′s or 70′s. In fact, I’ve started adding a “bit of history” from this archives into my weekly “look back” posts on Sundays as well as to my newsletters. So of course I used this tool to learn about crochet health when I was doing the research for my book on the health benefits of crochet. Here were some of the stories I came across.

1949: Man Crochets to Cure Ulcers

A news report from 1949 shares that a man who started crocheting as a bet with his wife ended up feeling like it reduced his ulcers. At the time it was believed that ulcers were primarily caused by stress. Crochet is a relaxing activity and he felt that the de-stressing it offered calmed him enough to alleviate his symptoms. Stress exacerbates a diverse range of health conditions which is why doing a relaxing activity is healing for such a variety of ailments.

1975: Woman Copes with Grief by Crocheting Afghans

Crochet can be a powerful tool to help during the period of grieving for a lost loved one. In 1975 journalist Judy Werley shared the story of Mrs. Lena Casilli who lost her father and felt lost without him. She started crocheting afghans and is quoted as saying it is the best therapy ever.

1976: Wartime Vet Crochets as Therapy

Crochet can be used in various aspects of PTSD treatment and prevention. A 1976 newspaper article tells about a man who was stationed on the front lines in the Korean War and took up crocheting to help him quell the nervousness. He continued crocheting bedspreads as a form of therapy after he was done with the war.

1979: Man Crochets to Quit Drinking

I’ve talked here in the past about how crochet can be used to help end addictions of various kinds. A 1979 newspaper article tells about a “burly block mason” who had a drinking problem that he successfully quit by staying busy with crochet.

1989: Smoker Uses Crochet to Quit Addiction

In 1989 there was a news report about a woman who had been a lifelong smoker but was able to quit thanks in part to taking up crochet and using it as a distracting activity to keep her hands and mind busy when she wanted a cigarette.

1993: Woman Crochets as Physical Therapy for Wrist Injury

Della Green crocheted all of her life. When she broke her rest she used crochet as a form of physical therapy to rebuild her strength and range of motion.

These are just a few examples of how crochet has healed people over the years!

This post is part of my 10 day series of crochet health articles that I’m doing to celebrate the release of Crochet Saved My Life. If you’re interested in blogging about this book I’d be happy to send you a digital press kit. Contact me here.

pinit fg en rect gray 28 Amazing Crochet Health Stories from the Google Archives

I'm studying how crochet helps people. Please help by taking this survey. Learn more from the press release.

2 comments
joyannerose
joyannerose

Congratulations on your book. You should be proud to put out such a thought provoking book. And it's so true!. Actually I would have commented sooner, but it hit two nerves I don't like to think about.

You may remember, I told you my story when you recently asked why you started to crochet. I started during my Cancer treatment. I definitely needed something to keep my mind off the whole thing, and it helped with that and lots of the other things you mention that go along with a devastating illness. When I started, I did things for cancer awareness, and made flowers to take to chemo for other patients to put on their hats, etc.

I also recently lost my father to a long illness, and crocheted a lot at his bedside. It did help. He loved his "man shawl" afghan, and used it every day. At the end, I made a big warm poncho for myself (for my son's early baseball games). The more upset I was, the faster I crocheted:( It was very comforting, and I was glad I had the distraction, as I couldn't have started a new project then or right after he passed.

I read some excerpts from your book, they were spot on. So much so that right now, my father's passing is still too fresh to read the whole book. But when I'm able to, I definitely will. In the meantime, I want to thank you for putting it out there. Lots of times it's so hard to see what you need when you're in the midst of a life changing situation.

And I'm really glad you found crochet when you needed it the most.

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